Saturday, December 29, 2007

Inserting special characters in Word

You may sometimes need to type special characters that you find in the source text – a zero with a forward slash through it often used to represent diameter in Japanese technical documents is one example that comes to mind.

A. Superposing one character on the other.

Say you wish to place a slash on top of a zero.

1) Click Insert/Field

2) Click the Field Codes button.

3) Copy this line using Ctrl + C:

eq \O(0,/)

4) Now paste it in the Field Codes box after deleting the "=" sign (if you find it in the box).

5) Click OK.

The symbol should appear as follows:

You can similarly create the following by replacing the "0" and the "/" in the parenthesis of the equation by the relevant characters to obtain:


B. Inserting a horizontal bar above a character (say m)

Here is one way to do this:

1) Click Insert/Field

2) Click the Field Codes button.

3) Copy this line using Ctrl + C:

eq \x \to (m)

4) Now paste it in the Field Codes box after deleting the "=" sign (if you find it in the box).

5) Click OK.

You should get this:



You can similarly create the following by replacing the "m" in the parenthesis of the equation by relevant character:



You can copy any of the characters you created to an Autocorrect entry so that if you type "abar" you get:

3 comments:

WJS said...

I'm curious: What are the practical applications of B? Or is this like putting a long mark over the O in shogun?

Gururaj Rao said...

Often used to denote arithmetic mean (or average) in mathematics. I have come across x or m with a bar over it See Examples of means

Gururaj Rao

WJS said...

Thanks, GR!